Supporting Secure Attachment and Positive Parent-Child Relationships

December 8th, 12 PM - 1 PM ET

 DESCRIPTION

The parent-child attachment relationship is a crucial foundation for optimal development across the lifespan. Early attachment experiences influence how children learn to engage with others and they understand what to expect in relationships throughout their lives. This webinar will provide an overview of the role of attachment in supporting positive parent-child relationships, outline the patterns of early attachment, present a framework for promoting secure attachment, and discuss specific strategies for attachment-based, positive parent-child relationships. 

EXPERT PANELIST: 

Dr. Mary Motz is a Clinical Psychologist at Mothercraft’s Breaking the Cycle program in Toronto and an Adjunct Faculty in the Department of Psychology at York University. Since obtaining her degree in clinical-developmental psychology at York University in 2003, she has been working with pregnant people, infants, young children and their mothers who are at risk for maladaptive outcomes because of challenges related to substance use and mental health difficulties, interpersonal violence and trauma, marginalization by society and systemic violence, and poverty.
In collaboration with internal and community research partners, Dr. Motz has led the program evaluation and research at BTC and has supervised numerous research and clinical practicum students. Dr. Motz has authored numerous academic publications and technical reports, as well as provided training nationally and internationally related to promoting healthy infant and child development, assessing Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder, and providing trauma-informed interventions for families with infants and young children who have complex needs. Her primary research interests are identifying and understanding the mechanisms by which pregnant people and mothers living in conditions of risk are able to make changes to improve their own lives and the lives of their infants and young children.